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    Rest In Power, tilde.black

    and good luck tomasino on your future projects

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      its sad to see that this is not an open source license through

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        Well it’s not free software as defined by the FSF. But is that a bad thing? Isn’t this kind of cooperative spirit what “open source” should be about in the first place? I mean, if a MITM platform intended for usage by intelligence services is released under GPLv3, does that make it good for anyone?

        There were some debates almost two decades ago in the french-speaking world about free software (logiciel libre) vs freeing software (logiciel libérateur). This also echoes the more recent debates around RFC1984 at the IETF.

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        Site seems to be dead :(

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          Maybe it was for a while. It seems to be working just fine now :)

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          So in case it’s not really clear, it’s a collection of services provided by different hosts. Every service is provided a random host that’s a member of the CHATONS collective, and when you reload the page (or click the reload button) you can get a link to the same service on a different host.

          TLDR: it’s a centralized discovery page for different non-profit hosting providers, depending on the service you’re looking for

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              I really love Sourcehut for their philosophy of building things. It’s nice to see they’re starting to have some time to dedicate to the User Interface for the rest of us who still enjoy some web presence and discoverability :)

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                This situation has been going on for a while.. let’s organize!

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                  If you enjoyed this collection, maybe you would enjoy rawtext.club ;)

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                    Nice! Too bad “anarchy” category in there really has nothing about anarchism itself, focusing instead of homemade explosives.

                    Don’t forget to apt install anarchism fortune-anarchism ;)

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                      That’s true. In the 80s and early 90s, especially in phreaker and later hacker culture, anarchy meant a completely different thing!

                      I think what that section really shows is how young the whole scene was–not just that it was new, but that most of the people involved were 15-25. That’s a very selfish age range, and of course a lot of the writing would focus on how to get yours, rather than the benefit of society.

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                        In my opinion, it is more a symptom of a hopeless society that has been infected by consumerism. When egoistic self-interest is the only value promoted by social standards and you don’t have the privilege to start your own alternatives (because you’re too busy “making a living”, as they say), what is left to do except burning stuff?

                        I think the disenchanted parts of society have grown significantly in the past decades (because of further cuts to social programs), which means “outliers” are not alone anymore, and youth all around the planet seems to come back to the old ways of collective action (and revolution), instead of nihilist praxis. Maybe there’s hope for the future?

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                      So this is the exact opposite of Browsix :D

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                        SOLID STUFF! It even has tab completion!

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                          i don’t understand any of it but it’s freaking amazing!

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                            Stick a ModemManager-compatible phone/modem to your computer and you can receive/send your SMS directly through emails or XMPP

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                              Walk around a virtual room to have decentralized meetups.

                              The closer you are to people, the higher their volume. So you can have smaller talks then gather around and share your thoughts, just like in a real room.

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                                Nice article! The git identity alias is sweet, maybe i’ll start doing this :D

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                                  TL;DR a catalog zone is a special zone where you maintain a list of your authoritative zones so that secondary servers can automagically discover new zones they have to replicate

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                                    TL;DR

                                    Protocol semantics (eg. ActivityStreams vocabulary) refer to namespaces by HTTP URIs. However these URIs can become unavailable or unreliable over time. Refering to specs by a hash of theirs allows for future-proof discovery and lessened ambiguity.

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                                      This hosting coop apparently populates forge repositories (on Gitlab) with the DNS zones for their clients, so people can update them directly via git.

                                      Can’t wait to see something like this in the tildeverse!

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                                        Something like this exists: https://tildegit.org/.tilde/.tilde but it would be nice to have something for publicly accessible subdomains.

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                                          nice tbh i assumed .tilde was the zone for tilde servers, but it appears it’s open for individuals to register a name!

                                          maybe we could register my.tilde and distribute domain names in a more automated fashion such as netlib.re does?

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                                        This is pretty cool. I can’t see too many people being able to fund such an endeavor, though. One solution may be coops: for example, my father is part of a coop providing internet access in his area.

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                                          Yeah starting an ISP is rarely a one-person project. But usually one person starting the initiative leads to more people joining if there’s room for that (mailing list, face-to-face meetups, etc)

                                          But it doesn’t take that much resources to get started, especially for people who already have machines running in datacenters / internet exchanges.

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                                          If you thought it was a terrible idea to start with, congratulations! ;-)

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                                            Yay me! :D