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    Unfortunately, this article requires a Medium subscription to read. Or at the very least, will cost one of the 3 freebies users get each month (if they have not all been used up already).

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      Can you use your browser’s private mode to view it?

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        Good call. Didn’t think of that. Here’s an archive:

        https://web.archive.org/web/20190717145658/https://onezero.medium.com/the-dark-forest-theory-of-the-internet-7dc3e68a7cb1?gi=d272d1fa2701

        Medium is such a terrible little walled garden of its own now…

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          Yep… Speaking of dark forests…

          Interestingly, the tilde verse, I believe would count as one too.

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          Shame that Make is gone, but awesome that the issues have been made freely available.

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            It is kinda sad, but I think a lot of that was due to price. You’re targeting tinkerers who play with scrap and make things? A $15/issue magazine is probably not the best way.

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          No tilde sites yet?!?!?! :)

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            I’m going to likely do the same for Thunix. I’d recommend all tildeverse members do the same, tbh.

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              this is my take on the php-based parsedown wiki

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                I may… ahem borrow some code :P

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                  feel free!

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                Interesting…

                Seems the disruption started a bit before the earthquake. This could be game changing for detection efforts.

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                  Indeed. I had posted this previously, very interesting article in the subject: Earthquakes in the Sky

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                  This sounds super interesting. SSB is kinda cool, but does require a network connection, so something airgapped would be nice.

                  You may want to look into some of the work done by FreeNet, as they are able to transport FSK objects via sneakernet (Used to smuggle info in an out of North Korea).

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                    Nice find! Do you have any links to that work on the Clearnet?

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                      Well, crap. I did at one point, but they seem dead now :(

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                      That is odd, back when I spent more time on SSB, one of the things touted was that a network wasn’t needed. Updates could be done via a USB device by friends meeting at a pub, for instance. Has this changed?

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                        Maybe I’m incorrect? I thought it at least needed a wifi network in order to discover neghbors.

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                          I haven’t dug in enough to actually find process, but these two articles both reference using sneakernet as a medium for SSB updates.

                          https://staltz.com/an-off-grid-social-network.html

                          It’s even feasible to exchange latest news through sneakernet, using e.g. USB sticks.

                          https://gopher.floodgap.com/gopher/gw?gopher://sdf.org:70/0/users/rusty/Post04-ssb

                          You could save updates on a USB stick, give the stick to a friend & they could get the updated content.

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                            1. Despite having the capability to support Sneakernet, there are very few well supported plugins or packages for SSB that reliably support this. There have been discussions about it but if you actually want to replicate your SSB feed today without ever touching a UDP/TCP stack, your options are limited.

                            2. Having a fully sneakernet-based protocol would be great for constrained / lightweight systems. Unfortunately, SSB as it is today is best suited for desktops that can run Electron type apps (or install Node/NPM). You will be able to find partial implementations of the SSB protocol in other languages, but if you read through the source, you will quickly find that they either a) only implement part of the protocol b) are just a thin wrapper to a NodeJS-based SSB server on the local machine. I think these folks are working on an early stage Rust alternate implementation. Also, projects like Manyverse are improving this situation for Android/iOS, but are still pretty early. I think the main reason for this stagnation is that SSB has a lot of moving parts and a JS-based reference implementation rather than a fully documented protocol (at least since I last checked). I also think this could be avoided by focusing only on the sneakernet-based use cases (and not worrying about the network related ones) while also designing the protocol from a spec rather than a reference implementation.

                            TL;DR: The SSB of today supports sneakernet in theory, but not in practice. Furthermore, it does not supply a formal specification for implementations on constrained / non-Javascript systems.

                            === DISCLAIMER ===

                            I hope that readers of this comment do not interpret this as a criticism of the SSB protocol, but rather that I had some very specific requirements that SSB wasn’t really designed for. With that being said, it’s one of the best decentralized protocols in recent years and I use it daily. The SSBC is doing a great job of building a specific technology for a specific need

                            === END DISCLAIMER ===

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                              Been using SSB for years now and never seen the USB approach, but I’m curious now.

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                                This writeup had a reply that hit me:

                                BBSes did this all the time, via UUCP and QWK packets. This sounds like a great way to implement it, seeing as UUCP is designed just for this type of not-always-on connection.

                                Nothing says you cannot UUCP from a USB drive.

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                        Yep. Those were kinda my thoughts when it was brought up on the fediverse.

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                          This is why we can’t have nice things…

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                            Kinda neat idea. I wonder if they are using Othernet for the sat reception?

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                              Poor headline, not using ham radio, actually. Doing so could could be illegal.

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                                I think the original idea started out using ham radio, but then it was shot down by many people explaining the pecuniary interest part would make it illegal.

                                There’s quite an interesting intersection of ham radio, crypto currency nerds, and gun hoarders. I surmise it’s the whole bootstraps thing.

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                                This attitude has proliferated into more than electronics, too, sadly.

                                I even hear this attitude in the cycling community: Don’t repair a bearing! Toss it! Buy a new cartridge! Don’t refinish a brake pad, buy a new one! Don’t adjust your cables, buy a new set!

                                Or even “Get a new bike, this one has a bent derailleur!”

                                Thankfully, we locally have a “fixit” club/shop for bikes now. And a Really Really Free Market, where there’s a couple of people with “Something Broke? Bring it here, and I’ll try to fix it” “stands”.

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                                  This brings back some memories :) thanks!

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                                    I really liked the part on expectation of reciprocation that GPL enforces. The more I think about it, the more I favor a stance like that.

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                                      Exactly. The GPL is a self-enforcing improvement cycle, vs the MIT which lets anyone just take the code, and offer nothing back.

                                      I do get the whole “which is freer” argument, and it really boils down to whose freedoms are you caring more about? Developer freedom, or user freedom.

                                      The GPL (And AGPL) target user freedoms, MIT/BSD target developer’s freedoms. Sadly, though “developers” tend to be corporations now, not individual contributors.

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                                      Excellent write up, and great original content :)

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                                        Thanks!

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                                        This person is a god that walks among us… They actually got me using mutt full-time, with the mutt-wizard :)

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                                            The website mentions Namecoin, which is based on the same tach but is not actually Bitcoin. Using this would suck, asolutely. I know too little of the resources used by nNamecoin, though.

                                            The interesting part about this project is the approach to decentralization.

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                                              Yeah, I’ve run into some folks stumping for this thing a few times… On reddit, they tend to be people making the software stack, trying to get people to use their coin so they can hold an ICO, but seem to be unable to explain why this is different than the million of other systems that don’t waste resources like proof of work coin mining does.

                                              I do like decentralization, but not at the cost of our environmental conditions.

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                                                Same.

                                                The people who are shilling for this tech really seem to be many of the same people who stand to benefit from it as a commercial profitability thing. There’s no real world application I can see that’s not as easily accomplished using other non-blockchain tech - like beaker/dat

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                                            Ugh… I didn’t realize the future of HL2 EP3 was so bleak, but glad I got to read the “Fan fic” for it.

                                            Lets me get a bit of closure… But not, since “The Hauntedvaunts” scooped him up, and Mrs. X scooped up the son Alex… what now?!?!?

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                                              Oh man, I miss hypercard… Talk about rapid application development :)

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                                                Pretty neat! I’m glad there’s a cyberpunk MOO, as the “D&D” themed ones get kinda old after a while :)

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                                                  so this kid came into the library one day asking for a fantasy book with absolutely no magic and absolutely no non-human races, and the librarians were scrambling and struggling to find something for him until they realized that he just wanted medieval fiction about valiant knights and not any “D&D themed” stuff.

                                                  it’s funny how you can kind of trick yourself and trap yourself into a genre sometimes.

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                                                    That could even work too…